Ulf Kristersson, elected by Swedish Parliament as new PM, gets backing by the far-right

Ulf Kristersson, the leader of Sweden’s conservative party, was chosen as prime minister by parliament on Monday. This is the first time the far-right Sweden Democrats have supported a government.

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Ulf Kristersson, the leader of Sweden’s conservative party, was chosen as prime minister by parliament on Monday. This is the first time the far-right Sweden Democrats have supported a government.

After striking a deal with his Moderate Party, the Christian Democrats, and the Liberals on Friday to create a three-party administration, supported in parliament by their main ally, the far-right Sweden Democrats, Kristersson, 58, was chosen with 176 votes in favour and 173 votes against.

The four issued a 62-page blueprint for collaboration, which among other things called for harsh crackdowns on crime and immigration as well as the building of new nuclear reactors.

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Jimmie Akesson, the leader of the Sweden Democrats, told the legislature that although his party desired to be in the government and occupy cabinet positions, the policies that the administration carried out were more crucial.

“It is what the government does that is important, not what the government looks like,” Akesson said.

His party came in second place to the Social Democrats, who have controlled Swedish politics since the 1930s, with a record 20.5 percent of the vote, making it the big winner in Sweden’s general election on September 11.

Although the four have put on a united face, they have historically disagreed on a number of important policy matters, and significant compromises were made in the agreement, mostly to satisfy the demands of the far-right.