US Secretary of State Blinken wants an “inclusive” UN Security Council, hinting India’s membership

India along with Japan, Brazil and Germany, which are combined referred to as the G4 has been at the forefront of this particular reform and underlined the necessity of their presence in the Security Council as permanent members.

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The US Secretary of State, Anthony Blinken has emphasized the need for making the United Nations Security Council more inclusive by increasing the number of permanent members.

India along with Japan, Brazil and Germany, which are combined referred to as the G4 has been at the forefront of this particular reform and underlined the necessity of their presence in the Security Council as permanent members.

“We recognise that to meet the challenges we face, members of the UN must not only uphold the charter but also modernise the institution, including by making the Security Council more inclusive,” Blinken told reporters at a joint news conference with visiting External Affairs Minister S Jaishankar.

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“That’s why, in his address to the General Assembly, President (Joe) Biden expressed his support for increasing the number of both permanent and non-permanent representatives of the Security Council, a long-standing goal of India,” he added

“This includes permanent seats for those nations we’ve long supported, and permanent seats for countries in Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean,” Blinken stated.

Currently, the Security Council has 15 members, which include 5 permanent members, i.e, the United States, the United Kingdom, Russia, France, and China. The group has 10 non-permanent members that vacate their posts every 2 years.

There has been a lot of demand from various parts of the world to expand the permanent membership in the UNSC as this group was formed over 75 years ago in accordance with the time post the Second World War. However, it fails to reflect the current global order.

“We appreciate the positive approach of the US to this issue reflected in the position articulated by President Biden himself. We look forward to working with the US to take this further,” he said.

“I also expressed appreciation at the strong cooperation that we have got from the US on the question of tackling international terrorism. In particular, I refer to the listing of well-known and wanted terrorists by the UN sanction process. In many other formats too, our two countries to keep the world safer and more secure,” Jaishankar said.

China, a permanent member of the Security Council with veto power, has consistently blocked efforts by the US, India, and other allies to add Pakistan-based terrorists to the Council’s 1267 Al Qaeda Sanctions blacklist.

Last week, China blocked a US-sponsored resolution at the UN that sought to designate Lashkar-e-Taiba terrorist Sajid Mir as a global terrorist. Mir is wanted for his alleged role in the 26/11 Mumbai terrorist attacks.

China, a permanent member of the Security Council with veto power, has consistently blocked efforts by the US, India, and other allies to add Pakistan-based terrorists to the Council’s 1267 Al Qaeda Sanctions blacklist.

Last week, China blocked a US-sponsored resolution at the UN that sought to designate Lashkar-e-Taiba terrorist Sajid Mir as a global terrorist. Mir is wanted for his alleged role in the 26/11 Mumbai terrorist attacks.

China blocked a US and Indian resolution to blacklist Abdul Rauf Azhar, the brother of Jaish-e-Mohammed (JEM) leader Masood Azhar and a key figure in the Pakistan-based terror group, at the UN last month. The US imposed sanctions on Pakistani-born Abdul Rauf Azhar in December 2010.

A joint proposal from India and the US to include terrorist Abdul Rehman Makki in the 1267 Al-Qaida Sanctions Committee of the UN Security Council was put on hold by China in June of this year at the last minute.