U.S witnesses worst outbreak of bird flu, more than 47 million birds affected

According to officials, the virus has now taken a different form and has attacked more wild birds than the farmers battled before.

Advertisement

A near-record number of chickens and turkeys have died in this year’s outbreak of bird flu in the United States. According to officials, the virus has now taken a different form and has attacked more wild birds than the farmers battled before.

The virus has killed more than 47 million birds due to several infections and Cullings. This has resulted in spike of export bans, declined egg and turkey production, and majorly promoted to surge in record prices of staples ahead of the U.S holiday season. The outbreak augments economic pain for consumers wrestling with soaring inflation.

The state had declared its worst animal-health event to date in 2015’s outbreak which killed around 50.5 million birds.

Advertisement

According to Rosemary Sifford, chief veterinary officer for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), farmers are battling a subtype of the H5N1 strain of the virus that survived over the summer, when surging temperatures typically reduce bird flu.

According to an interview she gave, the Goose/Guangdong lineage subtype is spreading throughout Europe. The bird flu outbreak in Europe has already resulted in the culling of approximately 50 million birds.

The variant is being detected by officials in a wider range of animals in the wild than in the past, including ducks, and it appears to live longer in the birds, according to Sifford. As they travel, she said there may still be a high risk of infection into the summer of 2023.

The United States is currently keeping an eye out for bird flu in four flyways—an increase from the previous two—and will do the same thing the following year.