Moving closer to a potential ban on Facebook and Instagram EU-US data flows

A data transfer agreement between the EU and the US was declared unconstitutional in 2020 by the highest court in Europe, citing privacy concerns. This prompted the Data Protection Commission (DPC) of Ireland to issue a temporary order blocking the method used by Meta to transfer data.

Advertisement

When it shared a modified draught order with other EU regulators on Thursday, Ireland’s data privacy authority took one step closer to a decision that would stop EU-US data transfers by Meta-owned Facebook and Instagram, a spokesperson said.

A data transfer agreement between the EU and the US was declared unconstitutional in 2020 by the highest court in Europe, citing privacy concerns. This prompted the Data Protection Commission (DPC) of Ireland to issue a temporary order blocking the method used by Meta to transfer data.

The DPC’s investigation has continued concurrently, and it informed its EU counterparts of the draught decision on Thursday, the spokeswoman said, even though the European Union and US have since established a tentative data transfer agreement in an effort to resolve the limbo.

Advertisement

Regarding the draught decision’s text, the representative declined to comment.

Before a final decision is made, regulators from across the EU have one month to provide their input under privacy laws that were enacted in 2018. The process could be delayed for months if there are any complaints, which are frequently raised in these situations.

Because Meta and many other of the greatest IT companies in the world have their EU headquarters in Ireland, the DPC is the EU’s primary regulator of these firms.