Arabic Students of English Like Slang and Don’t Care Much for Music: Bright AI Surveys English Language Learners Worldwide

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Abu Dhabi , Feb. 16, 2024 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Bright AI, the leading global publisher of AI-powered language learning apps, with over 25 million downloads, has produced a report on the preferences of students around the world regarding certain topics.  

Language learning is a highly individualized journey: pursuing different life goals, the learning path of each individual differs. Bright AI tackles this diversity, offering 42 different language topics to meet the broadest scope of student profiles. Leveraging cutting-edge AI technologies, Bright AI creates a personal course that will best suit that individual student.

Statistical analyses reveal that, between students from different countries, there is variation in the parts of those 42 language wordsets that pique interest. It may be tied to the cultural characteristics of their respective nations. Our findings also highlight disparities that can be related to students’ ages and language proficiency levels.

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Arabic Landscape

Bright AI has stats on the preferences of students from Arabic countries, which is its domestic region:

  • Students from Arabic countries are less keen on learning how to speak about Music. In Saudi Arabia, music has been banned for several decades, beginning in the 1920s. However, these restrictions have been gradually relaxed in recent years, representing progress and steps towards transforming its economy and modernizing society. In Oman and the UAE, there tends to be more cultural openness and diversity, with various forms of musical expression coexisting alongside traditional and religious influences.
  • Students from Arabic countries have a statistically distinguishable interest in learning English Slang and Idioms. These expressions are valuable for communicating more effectively in day-to-day situations, demonstrating that Arabic students learn English for practical purposes, such as travel, socializing, or working in an English-speaking environment.
  • Along with the majority of other countries, Arabic students tend to skip vocabulary from the Friends TV Series, which, aside from geographical preferences, serves as a perfect distinction between students older and younger than 25 years old. The ability to watch it live back then may be a factor.
  • Arabic students are less concerned about the vocabulary of Weather and Climate, and also The Environment. Egyptian students show the least interest in Plants, Linking Phrases, and also Health and Medicine.
  • Students from the UAE are the least interested in Sports among all Arabic countries .
  • Students from Saudi Arabia and Oman are slightly more interested in the Work and Employment topic, than the UAE’s and Egypt’s students. 

Global Landscape

Aside from Arabic countries, Bright AI obtained stats on the preferences of students from all over the world. It revealed that:

  • Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Hong Kong, and China show less interest in the topic of the Human body. Certain cultures may have taboos or sensitivities around discussing topics related to human anatomy. 
  • Arabic countries (Oman, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE) are less keen on learning how to speak about Music. In Saudi Arabia, music has been banned for several decades, beginning in the 1920s. However, these restrictions have been gradually relaxed in recent years, representing progress and steps towards transforming its economy and modernizing society. In Oman and the UAE, there tends to be more cultural openness and diversity, with various forms of musical expression coexisting alongside traditional and religious influences.
  • China and France appear indifferent to the topic of Slang. Both Chinese and French cultures often place a significant emphasis on formality and respect in communication. Slang may be discouraged or considered inappropriate in formal settings, such as education, business, and official communication.
  • Vietnam, Thailand, Taiwan, and Indonesia demonstrate a higher interest in Technologies, which is no surprise given the sharp growth of the tech sector in the APAC region. 
  • Japan is not interested in Clothes and Accessories. Traditional Japanese aesthetics often emphasize simplicity, minimalism, and functionality. Japan has a strong tradition of uniform culture, particularly in schools and workplaces. The prevalence of uniforms can contribute to a focus on conformity and standardization in attire, which may lead to less emphasis on individualistic fashion choices.
  • Vietnam, Taiwan, China, and Poland show less interest in Linking Phrases. Certain languages, including Mandarin Chinese, often convey relationships between ideas implicitly through context or shared understanding. In some East Asian cultures, there may be a strong emphasis on shared cultural context. Speakers might assume a common understanding among listeners, minimizing the need for explicit linking phrases. 
  • Spain, Italy, and Japan are seemingly uninterested in the topic of Driving. Our hypothesis is that these countries have well-developed and efficient public transportation systems. In cities where public transit is convenient, reliable, and widely used, there may be less necessity or motivation for individuals to drive.
  • Taiwan, South Korea, Hong Kong, China, and Germany are more interested in Notional Concepts than others. These are countries known for their advancements in the spheres of technology and innovation, and individuals may, therefore, be more inclined to engage with notional concepts related to scientific and technological developments. Besides, China and Germany have rich philosophical traditions. A historical emphasis on philosophy and abstract thinking could contribute to a cultural inclination towards exploring notional concepts to understand the world.
  • Surprisingly, students below 16 are more concerned with Health and Medicine than older ones. They also demonstrate a higher interest in Space and Science – as well as in Plants, although, on that one, we are still trying to figure out why. 
  • Advanced learners stand out by their interest in Linking Phrases, Idioms and Technology. 
  • There are no significant fluctuations in interest in Lifestyle, Feelings and Emotions, nor in Eating. These topics unite people around the globe. 

Bright AI CEO and Founder Dmitry Basalkin said: ”We recognize the critical role of personalization in language learning. By delving into each student’s unique learning journey, we can align our efforts with their individual needs rather than conforming to a generic educational framework. Instead of employing a one-size-fits-all approach with standardized learning materials, Generative AI tailors a personalized course for each student, providing an array of engaging exercises to facilitate continuous learning and enhance retention of previously mastered content.”

About

UAE-based Bright AI is a publisher of innovative language apps that help people learn foreign languages through deeply personalized learning based on their life goals and scenarios. With 25+ million downloads so far, Bright AI is one of the global leaders in AI-powered language learning.

Bright AI leverages Generative AI, speech synthesis, and recognition breakthroughs to bridge the gap between learning languages with a real tutor and a digital one. Bright AI’s educational process is aimed at making learning effective instead of simply incentivizing users to spend as much time in an app as possible. Bright AI adjusts the educational process to meet students’ needs, boosting motivation and leading to fast and robust progress. Bright AI offers an opportunity to align language learning with students’ life goals and dreams. 

For more information, please visit https://www.brightapps.ai/

CONTACT: Paul pr at brightapps.ai

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